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Verville VCP

This tag is associated with 33 posts

Retrial – the trial court acquitted the case after full trial on benefit of doubt without considering the medical evidence, and due to non speaking of evidence clearly , due to hostile witnesses and due to improvements- Appellant court set aside the acquittal and remanded the case for fresh trail on petition – High court in revision set aside the retrial order and also set aside the main order of appeal which found prima faice case, with out considering and assessing the medical evidence – Apex court on petition for retrial held that no retrial can be order and confirmed the view of high court – Apex court on SLP against revision held that High court committed wrong in allowing the revision with out considering material as to why the lower appellant court set aside the acquittal order – Apex court remanded the case to high court for fresh disposal on this point = MARY PAPPA JEBAMANI ..Appellant Versus GANESAN & ORS. ..Respondents = published in http://judis.nic.in/supremecourt/imgst.aspx?filename=41055

Retrial –  the trial court acquitted the case after full trial on benefit of doubt   without     considering the medical evidence, and due to non speaking of evidence clearly , due to hostile witnesses and due to improvements- Appellant court set aside the acquittal and remanded the case for fresh trail on petition … Continue reading

Sec.138 ,139 and sec. 118 of N.I.Act – Burden of proof – when the complainant not able to say the date when the amount was given – when failed to produce source of income – when gave contradictory statement about filling of cheque whether by accused or by himself – when there is no pleading that cheque was filled with the consent of accused – mere lack of issuing a reply notice and mere non putting a suggestion that the cheque was a blank cheque are not countable points to over throw the positive admissions made by the complainant – Lower court rightly dismissed the complaint – High court wrongly with out assigning valid reasons convict the accused – Apex court set aside the high court orders = John K. Abraham …. Appellant VERSUS Simon C. Abraham & Another …. Respondents = published in http://judis.nic.in/supremecourt/imgst.aspx?filename=41045

 Sec.138 ,139 and sec. 118 of N.I.Act – Burden of proof  – when the complainant not able to     say the date when the amount was given – when failed to produce source of income – when gave contradictory statement about filling of cheque whether by accused or by himself – when there is … Continue reading

Sec.302 , 498 A I.P.C = F.I.R. to sub inspector that accidentally sari caught with fire of stove = Dying declaration recorded by Magistrate revealed that husband burnt her alive by pouring kerosin = Explanation by parents that F.I.R. statement was given at the instance of accused sister = Conviction is proper = NANDEPU ABRAHAM Appellant (s) VERSUS STATE OF A.P. Respondent(s) = published in http://courtnic.nic.in/supremecourt/qrydisp.asp

F.I.R. to sub inspector that accidentally sari caught with fire of stove = Dying declaration     recorded by Magistrate revealed that husband burnt her alive by pouring kerosin = Explanation by parents that F.I.R. statement was given at the instance of accused sister = Conviction is proper =   ‘ PW-8 N. Victor Immanuel, at … Continue reading

Sec. 304 B of I.P.C. and sec.113 B of Evidence Act = Suicide was committed soon after 5 days of demand of dowry, with in 7 years of marriage, burden lies on the accused to disprove the case – he can not depend on minor latches of prosecution with out proper foundations – High court rightly convicted the husband and confirmed the acquittal of lower court in respect of other accused = SUKHWINDER SINGH …APPELLANT Versus STATE OF PUNJAB …RESPONDENT = published in http://judis.nic.in/supremecourt/imgst.aspx?filename=40964

Minor discrepancies like she said at room , at varanda does not change substance of     the case=   It is true that there can be no compromise  on  basic   legal principles, but, unnecessary weightage should not be  given  to  minor   errors or lapses.  If courts get carried away by every mistake … Continue reading

376(2)(g) and 302/34, IPC and sec. 306 of Cr.p.c – Approver – Lower court punished to death basing on the evidence of approver – High court disbelieved the version of approver as he has not disclosed himself as prima accused in the offence and lack of corroboration and set aside the sentence – Apex court set aside the high court order – punished for life etc., = State of Rajasthan …… Appellant Versus Balveer @ Balli & Anr. ….. Respondents – Reported in http://judis.nic.in/supremecourt/filename=40947

376(2)(g) and 302/34, IPC and sec. 306 of Cr.p.c – Approver – Lower court punished to     death basing on the evidence of approver – High court disbelieved the version of approver as he has not disclosed himself as prima accused in the offence and lack of corroboration and set aside the sentence – Apex court set aside … Continue reading

Under Sec. 304 Part II of IPC – sentence reduced to 7 years from life – KUNWAR PAL Vs. STATE OF UTTARAKHAND published in judis.nic.in/supremecourt/filename=40870

Sec. 304 Part II of IPC = Using guns in marriage ceremonies even though prohibited – when     caused death of a person who gathered in the marriage ceremony, the accused is liable to be punished under sec. 304 Part II of the IPC. but not under rash and negligent act under sec. 304 … Continue reading

Sec. 304 B I.P.C.= PANCHANAND MANDAL @ … APPELLANTS PACHAN MANDAL & ANR. VERSUS STATE OF JHARKHAND … RESPONDENT published in judis.nic.in/supremecourt/filename=40850

REPORTABLE     Sec. 304 B I.P.C. Non – examination of the scribe A.S.I. of dying declaration is fatal to the prosecution; No evidence of cruelty or harassment in connection with demand of dowry soon before the death; prosecution failed to prove it’s case beyong reasonable doubts – Appeal allowed; Thus, we find that, practically there was … Continue reading

DEATH CONFIRMED = Herein, A1 and A2 have committed a cold blooded murder in a pre-ordained fashion without any provocation whatsoever. The motive behind the gruesome act was to avenge the act of informant in approaching the machinery of law enforcement inspite of threats by the appellants. The victims were five innocent children and wife of the informant who were sleeping unalarmed when the appellants came and locked them inside their house while it was set ablaze. Further, wrath of A1 and A2 is reflected in their act of first gagging the informant, thereafter attempting to burn him alive and later, when he tried to escape, firing at him thereby leaving no stone unturned in translating their threats into reality. As a result of the aforesaid incident, having witnessed the threats of burning given by the A1 to the informant tuned into reality, none but the family of the deceased-informant came forth to depose against the appellant-accused persons during the trial. The crime, enormous in proportion having wiped off the whole family, is committed so brutally that it pricks and shocks not only the judicial conscience but even the collective conscience of the society. It demands just punishment from the Court and the Court is bound to respond within legal parameters. The demand for justice and the award of punishment have to be in consonance with the legislative command and the discretion vested in the Courts. “…the punishment is the way in which society expresses its denunciation of wrong doing; and, in order to maintain respect for the law, it is essential that the punishment inflicted for grave crimes should adequately reflect the revulsion felt by the great majority of citizens for them. It is a mistake to consider the objects of punishments as being a deterrent or reformative or preventive and nothing else… The truth is that some crimes are so outrageous that society insists on adequate punishment, because the wrong doer deserves it, irrespective of whether it is a deterrent or not.” 90. In light of the aforesaid, having regard to the gravity of the offence committed, we are of the considered opinion that with regard to A1 and A2 this case falls into the category of rarest of the rare cases and is not a case where imprisonment for life is an adequate sentence and thus, constrained to reach the inescapable conclusion that death sentence imposed on A1 and A2 be confirmed. 91. Therefore, the sentence of death imposed on A1 and A2 is confirmed and the sentence awarded to A3 is commuted to life imprisonment till the rest of his life. 92. The order of stay on the execution of the capital punishment of A1 and A2 is vacated.

punishable in    http://judis.nic.in/supremecourt/imgst.aspx?filename=40794          REPORTABLE     IN THE SUPREME COURT OF INDIA CRIMINAL APPELLATE JURISDICTION   CRIMINAL APPEAL NOS.249-250 OF 2011       DEEPAK RAI Appellant(s)   VERSUS   STATE OF BIHAR Respondent(s)   WITH   CRIMINAL APPEAL NOS.1747-1748 OF 2011       JAGAT RAI AND ANR. Appellant(s) … Continue reading

Whether the offence falls under Section 304 Part II IPC and not Section 302 IPC = the manner in which the deceased was assaulted and the brutality of the assault shows that the accused formed an unlawful assembly with the object of killing the deceased. The blow landed on the deceased by Perumal had brought the deceased to the ground whereupon the accused continued brutalising the deceased with the help of stones, in the process crushing his head and squeezing his testicles. We have no manner of doubt that the nature of injuries caused to the deceased were clearly indicative of the accused having had the intention of killing him. The use of the words “with that he must go” by appellant No.2 is only a manifestation of that intention. 18. There is, therefore, no room for altering the conviction from Section 302 to Section 304 Part II, IPC as argued by the learned counsel. 19. In the result this appeal fails and is hereby dismissed.

published in   http://judis.nic.in/supremecourt/imgst.aspx?filename=40749   REPORTABLE IN THE SUPREME COURT OF INDIA CRIMINAL APPELLATE JURISDICTION CRIMINAL APPEAL NO.1623 OF 2009 Shanmugam and Anr. …Appellants Versus State Rep. by Inspector of Police, T. Nadu …Respondent   J U D G M E N T T.S. THAKUR, J. 1. This appeal arises out of a judgment and order dated … Continue reading

Letter of deceased which can not be treated as Dying Declaration, can not be considered as admissible evidence in the absence of corroboration = the High Court found the appellant to be guilty of the offence under Section 498A, IPC, because of some conduct or acts of the appellant of which the deceased has complained of in her letter to the Police Station on 26.03.1992. She submitted that the High Court held that the acts or conduct of the appellant amounted to cruelty for which the appellant was liable for the offence under Section 498A, IPC, but did not amount to abetment of suicide within the meaning of Section 306, IPC. She submitted that the statements of the deceased in the letter of the deceased to the Police Station (Ext.10) were not proof of the acts or conduct of the appellant in the letter and in any case these acts or conduct of the appellant did not amount to cruelty within the meaning of clauses (a) or (b) of the Explanation under Section 498A, IPC. Unless the statement of a dead person would fall within the purview of Section 32(1) of the Indian Evidence Act there is no other provision under which the same can be admitted in evidence. In order to make the statement of a dead person admissible in law (written or verbal) the statement must be as to the cause of her death or as to any of the circumstance of the transactions which resulted in her death, in cases in which the cause of death comes into question. By no stretch of imagination can the statements of Damyanti contained in Exhibit P-7 or Exhibit P-8 and those quoted by the witnesses be connected with any circumstance of the transaction which resulted in her death. Even that apart, when we are dealing with an offence under Section 498-A IPC disjuncted from the offence under Section 306 IPC the question of her death is not an issue for consideration and on that premise also Section 32(1) of the Evidence Act will stand at bay so far as these materials are concerned. 16. In the present case also, except Ext.10, the letter written by the deceased to the Police Station on 26.03.1992, no other witness has spoken about the appellant having starved the deceased of food and having committed acts of mental cruelty to the deceased. On the other hand, the mother of the deceased (PW-3) has stated in her cross-examination: “I have not recorded in my statement before police that Amri was giving her salary to her husband. It is not true that when I went to see Amri, at that time, my daughter was crying she had food problem, I say it is false.” =in this case there is no evidence of any physical harm having been caused by the appellant to the deceased nor any acts of mental cruelty committed by him. Hence, the appellant cannot be held guilty of any cruelty within the meaning of clause (a) of the Explanation under Section 498A, IPC. In the result, we set aside the impugned judgment of the High Court and acquit the appellant of the charge under Section 498A, IPC. Since the appellant is on bail, his bail bonds be discharged.

reported http://judis.nic.in/supremecourt/imgst.aspx?filename=40593 Reportable IN THE SUPREME COURT OF INDIA CRIMINAL APPELLATE JURISDICTION CRIMINAL APPEAL No. 1567 of 2007 Kantilal Martaji Pandor …… Appellant Versus State of Gujarat & Anr. ….. Respondents J U D G M E N T A. K. PATNAIK, J. This is an appeal by way of special leave under Article 136 of … Continue reading

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